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Whales

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Whales

Whales face many threats to their welfare, health, and their existence. The main cause is commercial hunting and pollution. Chemicals and pesticides can poison their internal systems, while discarded rubbish like nets, plastics or fishing lines can strangle the animals to death. Whales are, just like dolphins, highly acoustic mammals. Noise caused by coastal developments and industrial activities can disrupt whales. Tourism also effects whales. They can feel very harassed, especially when they are breeding and calving.
whales
When chemicals pollute the oceans, the food of whales also gets polluted. Female whales then pass these pollutants directly on to their young through their milk, which can result in death or disability. These pollutants also cause the lowering of the whale's resistance to disease. This means they are more likely to die from diseases.

Commercial as well as scientific whaling by countries as Japan and others remains a huge threat to the survival of certain whale species.

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Whales in the News

Dolphins and Whales News -- ScienceDaily

Hush, little baby: Mother right whales 'whisper' to calves - A recent study explores whether right whale mother-calf pairs change their vocalizations to keep predators from detecting them.
Scientists uncover genetic similarities among species that use sound to navigate - Insect-eating bats navigate effortlessly in the dark and dolphins and killer whales gobble up prey in murky waters thanks in part to specific changes in a set of 18 genes involved in the development of the cochlear ganglion -- a group of nerves that transmit sound from the ear to the brain, according to a new study.
Researchers use drones to weigh whales - Researchers have devised a way to accurately estimate the weight of free-living whales using only aerial images taken by drones.