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Earth Platform - Environment Search Engine

Earth Platform
 

Earth Platform

earthplatformWelcome to Earth Platform, the environmental website that informs you about our natural planet and the emerging threats to our world today. With subjects like deforestation, global warming, endangered species and environmental pollution.

It's organised into clear categories: Nature, AnimalsEnergy, Pollution and Organisations.

Earth Platform contains a unique Environmental Search Engine, giving direct access to a wide range of news, background information and related websites. You can type any searchword or words in the window on top of any page (e.g: plants, hunting, air pollution or climate change).

In addition, you will find links to relevant websites at the bottom of each page. Earth Platform provides newsarticles about environmental, wildlife, energy, pollution and Earth related issues. Last but not least, cast your vote in our polls and take a look at the results.

We hope you'll enjoy our Earth Platform website and search engine, and learn more about our planet's beautiful natural wildlife and environment!

 

Organisations

The world over, lots of organisations are established to help protect nature and animals. We have listed information and weblinks to the main environmental protection organisations. We've divided these by geographic area. So you'll find the World Wildlife Fund under international, etc.

See more Earth related websites on our Resources page. 

Nature

In the category Nature you'll find information about natural landscapes, the seas, oceans and atmosphere. It shows today's  threats to our natural habitat, and the importance to deal with those threats and protect our environment now.

Animals

The Animals category is divided into three subcategories. There are pages about Land Animals, Marine Life and Birds. Within these subcategories you'll find information about individual species, such as the panda, tiger or turtle.

Energy

Renewable and Non-renewable energy are the subcategories of Energy. Here you'll find definitions and examples of the world's different sources of energy.

Pollution

Pollution is a threat to man, nature and animals alike. There are many sources of pollution, and most of these endanger lifeforms by bringing hazardous chemical substances in direct contact with nature.

Environment News

ENN: Top Stories

Something new to blame climate change on: Beavers. - There are consequences of the successful efforts worldwide to save beavers from extinction. Along with the strong increase in their population over the past 100 years, these furry aquatic rodents have built many more ponds, establishing vital aquatic habitat. In doing so, however, they have created conditions for climate changing methane gas to be generated in this shallow standing water, and the gas is subsequently released into the atmosphere. In fact, 200 times more of this greenhouse gas is released from beaver ponds today than was the case around the year 1900, estimates Colin J. Whitfield of the University of Saskatchewan in Canada. He led a study in Springer's journal AMBIO about the effect that the growth in beaver numbers in Eurasia and the Americas could be having on methane emissions. The fur trade of the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries nearly led to the extinction of beaver populations worldwide. After trapping was limited and conservation efforts led to the re-introduction of these animals into their natural ranges, the number of North American (Castor canadensis) and Eurasian (Castor fiber)beavers grew. The North American beaver has also been introduced to Eurasia and South America (specifically the archipelago of Tierra del Fuego); establishment of these populations has, in effect, created an anthropogenic greenhouse gas source in these landscapes.
Something new to blame climate change on: Beavers. - There are consequences of the successful efforts worldwide to save beavers from extinction. Along with the strong increase in their population over the past 100 years, these furry aquatic rodents have built many more ponds, establishing vital aquatic habitat. In doing so, however, they have created conditions for climate changing methane gas to be generated in this shallow standing water, and the gas is subsequently released into the atmosphere. In fact, 200 times more of this greenhouse gas is released from beaver ponds today than was the case around the year 1900, estimates Colin J. Whitfield of the University of Saskatchewan in Canada. He led a study in Springer's journal AMBIO about the effect that the growth in beaver numbers in Eurasia and the Americas could be having on methane emissions. The fur trade of the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries nearly led to the extinction of beaver populations worldwide. After trapping was limited and conservation efforts led to the re-introduction of these animals into their natural ranges, the number of North American (Castor canadensis) and Eurasian (Castor fiber)beavers grew. The North American beaver has also been introduced to Eurasia and South America (specifically the archipelago of Tierra del Fuego); establishment of these populations has, in effect, created an anthropogenic greenhouse gas source in these landscapes.

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