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Whales

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Whales

Whales face many threats to their welfare, health, and their existence. The main cause is commercial hunting and pollution. Chemicals and pesticides can poison their internal systems, while discarded rubbish like nets, plastics or fishing lines can strangle the animals to death. Whales are, just like dolphins, highly acoustic mammals. Noise caused by coastal developments and industrial activities can disrupt whales. Tourism also effects whales. They can feel very harassed, especially when they are breeding and calving.
whales
When chemicals pollute the oceans, the food of whales also gets polluted. Female whales then pass these pollutants directly on to their young through their milk, which can result in death or disability. These pollutants also cause the lowering of the whale's resistance to disease. This means they are more likely to die from diseases.

Commercial as well as scientific whaling by countries as Japan and others remains a huge threat to the survival of certain whale species.

More about:

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Whales in the News

Dolphins and Whales News -- ScienceDaily

First study of humpback whale survivors of orca attacks in the Southeastern Pacific - Scars left by orca attacks indicate that most victims are young whales on the first trip from breeding to feeding grounds. Increasing numbers of scars may mean that there are more orcas in the Southern Pacific, researchers say.
Watching whales from space - Scientists have used detailed high-resolution satellite images to detect, count and describe four different species of whales. The research is a big step towards developing a cost-effective method to study whales in remote and inaccessible places, that will help scientists to monitor population changes and understand their behavior.
Biologists gain new insights into surface, acoustic behaviors of endangered right whales - In response to the dwindling number of North Atlantic right whales, researchers have conducted a major study of the surface and acoustic behaviors of right whale mother-calf pairs. The team discovered that the near-surface resting behavior of mother-calf pairs dominates the first five months of the calves' lives.