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Whales

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Whales

Whales face many threats to their welfare, health, and their existence. The main cause is commercial hunting and pollution. Chemicals and pesticides can poison their internal systems, while discarded rubbish like nets, plastics or fishing lines can strangle the animals to death. Whales are, just like dolphins, highly acoustic mammals. Noise caused by coastal developments and industrial activities can disrupt whales. Tourism also effects whales. They can feel very harassed, especially when they are breeding and calving.
whales
When chemicals pollute the oceans, the food of whales also gets polluted. Female whales then pass these pollutants directly on to their young through their milk, which can result in death or disability. These pollutants also cause the lowering of the whale's resistance to disease. This means they are more likely to die from diseases.

Commercial as well as scientific whaling by countries as Japan and others remains a huge threat to the survival of certain whale species.

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Entrapment in fishing nets and marine pollution are threats various dolphins have to deal with.
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Whales in the News

Dolphins and Whales News -- ScienceDaily

Efforts are needed to enrich the lives of killer whales in captivity - Keeping Killer whales in zoos and aquariums has become highly controversial. In a new article, experts outline several novel ideas for improving the lives of Killer whales in zoological institutions by enhancing the communication, feeding, environment, and health of the animals in order to elicit natural behaviors seen in the wild.
Humpback habitats off Madagascar revealed as energy exploration ramps up - How humpback whales use marine habitats off the eastern coast of Africa is only partially understood, and that has become a conservation concern as offshore energy exploration expands in the region. However, a new study found that humpback whales that were satellite tagged off the coast of Madagascar during peak breeding season are traveling much further in the southwest Indian Ocean than previously thought.
New tag revolutionizes whale research, and makes them partners in science - A sophisticated new type of 'tag' on whales that can record data every second for hours, days and weeks at a time provides a view of whale behavior, biology and travels never before possible, scientists reported today in a new study. The data are also making whales partners in the study of climate change.