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Whales

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Whales

Whales face many threats to their welfare, health, and their existence. The main cause is commercial hunting and pollution. Chemicals and pesticides can poison their internal systems, while discarded rubbish like nets, plastics or fishing lines can strangle the animals to death. Whales are, just like dolphins, highly acoustic mammals. Noise caused by coastal developments and industrial activities can disrupt whales. Tourism also effects whales. They can feel very harassed, especially when they are breeding and calving.
whales
When chemicals pollute the oceans, the food of whales also gets polluted. Female whales then pass these pollutants directly on to their young through their milk, which can result in death or disability. These pollutants also cause the lowering of the whale's resistance to disease. This means they are more likely to die from diseases.

Commercial as well as scientific whaling by countries as Japan and others remains a huge threat to the survival of certain whale species.

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Entrapment in fishing nets and marine pollution are threats various dolphins have to deal with.
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Whales in the News

Dolphins and Whales News -- ScienceDaily

Shedding light on the origin of the baleen whale - The origin of filter feeding in baleen whales -- the largest animal known to have ever existed -- is now better understood, thanks to research on 'Alfred' the 25- million-year-old fossilized whale skull.
New forecast tool helps ships avoid blue whale hotspots - Scientists have long used satellite tags to track blue whales along the West Coast, learning how the largest animals on the planet find enough small krill to feed on to support their enormous size. Now researchers have combined that trove of tracking data with satellite observations of ocean conditions to develop the first system for predicting locations of blue whales off the West Coast. The system, called WhaleWatch, produces monthly maps of blue whale "hotspots" to alert ships where there may be an increased risk of encountering these endangered whales.
Teenage male whale sharks don’t want to leave home - Researchers have completed a huge photo-identification study to assess the seasonal habits of whale sharks in the tropics. They were surprised to discover that the male juveniles didn't seem to venture too far from home.