Earthplatform.com

Apes

Earth Platform > Animals > Land > Apes
 

Apes

A quarter of all ape species is threatened with extinction. Apes like the Chimpansee, the Bonobo, the Javan Lutung, the Wanderoe and the Nose ape are examples of threatened apes. A reason why apes are threatened, is that they are captured for human consumption. In some cultures, people think eating certain apes will provide magical powers or will raise their potency.

ApeMore alarming, the extinction of a group of apes can be the beginning of extinction of another group. Apes spread seeds of trees and plants of which other apes need to survive. If one group of apes doesn't spread the seeds anymore, other groups may lose their food supply. Seventy percent of all ape species are threatened by a reduction of their habitat. Humans are directly or indirectly responsible for this. Living area's are reduced because of mining, roads, dams, farming and logging. Apes are increasingly threatened by inbreeding and diseases, as well as regional and global trade in apes or ape-parts.

News about apes

Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily

Drawing inspiration from natural marvels to make new materials - The shape-shifting bristle worm has the unique ability to extend its jaw outside of its mouth and ensnare surprised prey. The metal coordination chemistry that makes this natural wonder possible can also be the key to creating new materials for use in sensors, healthcare applications, and much more.
Potential treatments for citrus greening - Over the course of 40 years, a biologist has become an expert in symbiotic bacteria that help alfalfa grow. She has published over 150 papers on this one topic but when she realized her lab's decades of highly focused research could contribute to a solution for citrus greening -- a disease that devastates citrus crops -- she was inspired to go in a new direction.
Genetic risk is associated with differences in gut microbiome - Children with a high genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes have different gut microbiomes than children with a low risk, according to a new study. The results suggest that genetic risk can shape an individual's response to environmental factors in the development of autoimmune diseases.