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Apes

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Apes

A quarter of all ape species is threatened with extinction. Apes like the Chimpansee, the Bonobo, the Javan Lutung, the Wanderoe and the Nose ape are examples of threatened apes. A reason why apes are threatened, is that they are captured for human consumption. In some cultures, people think eating certain apes will provide magical powers or will raise their potency.

ApeMore alarming, the extinction of a group of apes can be the beginning of extinction of another group. Apes spread seeds of trees and plants of which other apes need to survive. If one group of apes doesn't spread the seeds anymore, other groups may lose their food supply. Seventy percent of all ape species are threatened by a reduction of their habitat. Humans are directly or indirectly responsible for this. Living area's are reduced because of mining, roads, dams, farming and logging. Apes are increasingly threatened by inbreeding and diseases, as well as regional and global trade in apes or ape-parts.

News about apes

Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily

A scientific first: How psychedelics bind to key brain cell receptor - For the first time, scientists solved the high-resolution structure of these compounds when they are actively bound to the 5-HT2A serotonin receptor on the surface of brain cells. This discovery is already leading to the exploration of more precise compounds that could eliminate hallucinations but still have strong therapeutic effects. Psilocybin - the psychedelic compound in mushrooms - has already been granted breakthrough status by the FDA to treat depression.
Understanding the movement patterns of free-swimming marine snails - New research looks at the swimming and sinking kinematics of nine species of warm water pteropods (sea snails) to shed light on their ecology, predator-prey interactions, and vertical distributions. By using a high-speed stereophotogrammetry system, investigators were able to focus on how the shell shape, body geometry, and body size affect their swimming behavior from a fluid mechanics perspective, while image analysis and metabarcoding related swimming behaviors to night time and daytime vertical distributions.
Replicating a genome starts with a twist, a pinch, and a bit of a dance - DNA replication begins with a set of proteins -- the Origin of Replication Complex (ORC). Researchers published images of the human ORC in exquisite detail, showing how it changes shapes in dramatic ways as it assembles around DNA.