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Apes

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Apes

A quarter of all ape species is threatened with extinction. Apes like the Chimpansee, the Bonobo, the Javan Lutung, the Wanderoe and the Nose ape are examples of threatened apes. A reason why apes are threatened, is that they are captured for human consumption. In some cultures, people think eating certain apes will provide magical powers or will raise their potency.

ApeMore alarming, the extinction of a group of apes can be the beginning of extinction of another group. Apes spread seeds of trees and plants of which other apes need to survive. If one group of apes doesn't spread the seeds anymore, other groups may lose their food supply. Seventy percent of all ape species are threatened by a reduction of their habitat. Humans are directly or indirectly responsible for this. Living area's are reduced because of mining, roads, dams, farming and logging. Apes are increasingly threatened by inbreeding and diseases, as well as regional and global trade in apes or ape-parts.

News about apes

Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily

New method to detect off-target effects of CRISPR - Since the CRISPR genome editing technology was invented in 2012, it has shown great promise to treat a number of intractable diseases. However, scientists have struggled to identify potential off-target effects in therapeutically relevant cell types, which remains the main barrier to moving therapies to the clinic. Now, a group of scientists have developed a reliable method to do just that.
How the hepatitis B virus establishes persistent infection - New research sheds light on how a hepatitis B viral protein stimulates the expansion of immune cells that impair antiviral responses. The findings potentially explain how the hepatitis B virus (HBV) establishes and maintains chronic infection, and could lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies.
Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore - Paleontologists have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. Larger than a polar bear, with a skull as large as that of a rhinoceros and enormous piercing canine teeth, this massive carnivore would have been an intimidating part of the eastern African ecosystems occupied by early apes and monkeys.