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Apes

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Apes

A quarter of all ape species is threatened with extinction. Apes like the Chimpansee, the Bonobo, the Javan Lutung, the Wanderoe and the Nose ape are examples of threatened apes. A reason why apes are threatened, is that they are captured for human consumption. In some cultures, people think eating certain apes will provide magical powers or will raise their potency.

ApeMore alarming, the extinction of a group of apes can be the beginning of extinction of another group. Apes spread seeds of trees and plants of which other apes need to survive. If one group of apes doesn't spread the seeds anymore, other groups may lose their food supply. Seventy percent of all ape species are threatened by a reduction of their habitat. Humans are directly or indirectly responsible for this. Living area's are reduced because of mining, roads, dams, farming and logging. Apes are increasingly threatened by inbreeding and diseases, as well as regional and global trade in apes or ape-parts.

News about apes

Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily

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