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Apes

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Apes

A quarter of all ape species is threatened with extinction. Apes like the Chimpansee, the Bonobo, the Javan Lutung, the Wanderoe and the Nose ape are examples of threatened apes. A reason why apes are threatened, is that they are captured for human consumption. In some cultures, people think eating certain apes will provide magical powers or will raise their potency.

ApeMore alarming, the extinction of a group of apes can be the beginning of extinction of another group. Apes spread seeds of trees and plants of which other apes need to survive. If one group of apes doesn't spread the seeds anymore, other groups may lose their food supply. Seventy percent of all ape species are threatened by a reduction of their habitat. Humans are directly or indirectly responsible for this. Living area's are reduced because of mining, roads, dams, farming and logging. Apes are increasingly threatened by inbreeding and diseases, as well as regional and global trade in apes or ape-parts.

News about apes

Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily

Marsupial lived among Arctic dinosaurs - A research team has discovered a previously unknown species of marsupial that lived in Alaska's Arctic during the era of dinosaurs, adding a vivid new detail to a complex ancient landscape. The thumb-sized animal, named Unnuakomys hutchisoni, lived in the Arctic about 69 million years ago during the late Cretaceous Period.
Lobster's underbelly is as tough as industrial rubber - Flip a lobster on its back, and you'll see that the underside of its tail is split in segments connected by a translucent membrane that appears rather vulnerable when compared with the armor-like carapace that shields the rest of the crustacean. But engineers have found that this soft membrane is surprisingly tough, with a microscopic, layered, plywood-like structure that makes it remarkably tolerant to scrapes and cuts.
Fruit fly wing research reshapes understanding of how organs form - How do fruit flies grow their wings? Scientists discovered a surprising answer that could one day help diagnose and treat human genetic diseases. Even when scientists manipulate cells to change how they divide, the shape of a fruit fly's wing remains the same. The discovery changes the scientific understanding of how organs form.