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Birds

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Birds

There are approximately 400 endangered bird species in the world today. The bird habitat is getting smaller, despite increased government protection . Many bird species are reaching dangerously low numbers. Scores of bird species have become extinct in the past, far more than the current amount of existing bird species.

Through habitat destruction, the introduction of non-native species, and deliberate hunting, we endanger many species. In the last 280 years, 42 species and 44 subspecies of birds are known to have become extinct.

For more information about birds in different parts of the world, just follow one of the links under 'Read more about'.

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Habitat loss and degradation are threats African birds have to deal with.
Air pollution and human activities are the threats birds have to deal with in America.
The majority of Asian birds lives in forrests. These forrests are threatened by conversion to other land-uses and overexploitation. Therefor the birds are threatened by the same dangers.
Carrabean birds are threatened by erosion of pristine habitats and illegal trade of the birds.
Hunting and economic development are the majority of the causes that lead to death of birds in Europe.
On the pacific, habitat destruction and 'invasive alien species' are the larges threats.
Two threats to seabirds are longline fishing and oil spills.

News about birds

Birds News -- ScienceDaily

Molting feathers may help birds deal with environmental contaminants - Mercury is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that affects the health of birds and other wild animals.
High levels of antibiotic-resistance in Indian poultry farming raises concerns - A new study from India raises questions about the dangers to human health of farming chicken with growth-promoting antibiotics -- including some of the same drugs used in raising millions of chickens in the United States and worldwide.
Birds avoid crossing roads to prevent predation - It was once believed that roads posed no problem to birds because of their ability to fly. A new study finds that they can find these human-made structures problematic, especially small, forest-dwelling species. Their hesitance to cross roads could restrict their positive effects on the natural environment, such as seed dispersal, pollination and insect control.