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Birds

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Birds

There are approximately 400 endangered bird species in the world today. The bird habitat is getting smaller, despite increased government protection . Many bird species are reaching dangerously low numbers. Scores of bird species have become extinct in the past, far more than the current amount of existing bird species.

Through habitat destruction, the introduction of non-native species, and deliberate hunting, we endanger many species. In the last 280 years, 42 species and 44 subspecies of birds are known to have become extinct.

For more information about birds in different parts of the world, just follow one of the links under 'Read more about'.

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Habitat loss and degradation are threats African birds have to deal with.
Air pollution and human activities are the threats birds have to deal with in America.
The majority of Asian birds lives in forrests. These forrests are threatened by conversion to other land-uses and overexploitation. Therefor the birds are threatened by the same dangers.
Carrabean birds are threatened by erosion of pristine habitats and illegal trade of the birds.
Hunting and economic development are the majority of the causes that lead to death of birds in Europe.
On the pacific, habitat destruction and 'invasive alien species' are the larges threats.
Two threats to seabirds are longline fishing and oil spills.

News about birds

Birds News -- ScienceDaily

Can bird feeders do more harm than good? - Many bird lovers put out feeders full of seed for their feathered friends -- but those feeders may also attract predators that eat eggs and nestlings. The researchers behind a new study tried to untangle these relationships through a four-year study of songbird nests, bird feeders, and predators in urban central Ohio.
Migrating birds pile up along Great Lakes' shores - Birds prefer to migrate at night -- so much so that if day breaks while they're over water, they'll turn back toward the nearest shore rather than pressing on, concludes a new study that used weather radar to examine the behavior of birds crossing the Great Lakes.
Ice age vertebrates had mixed responses to climate change - New research examines how vertebrate species in the eastern United States ranging from snakes to mammals to birds responded to climate change over the last 500,000 years. The study reveals that contrary to expectation, the massive glaciers that expanded and contracted across the region affected animal populations in different ways at different times. The analysis provides a window into how animals might react to any kind of climate change, whether glacial cycles or global warming.