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Birds

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Birds

There are approximately 400 endangered bird species in the world today. The bird habitat is getting smaller, despite increased government protection . Many bird species are reaching dangerously low numbers. Scores of bird species have become extinct in the past, far more than the current amount of existing bird species.

Through habitat destruction, the introduction of non-native species, and deliberate hunting, we endanger many species. In the last 280 years, 42 species and 44 subspecies of birds are known to have become extinct.

For more information about birds in different parts of the world, just follow one of the links under 'Read more about'.

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Habitat loss and degradation are threats African birds have to deal with.
Air pollution and human activities are the threats birds have to deal with in America.
The majority of Asian birds lives in forrests. These forrests are threatened by conversion to other land-uses and overexploitation. Therefor the birds are threatened by the same dangers.
Carrabean birds are threatened by erosion of pristine habitats and illegal trade of the birds.
Hunting and economic development are the majority of the causes that lead to death of birds in Europe.
On the pacific, habitat destruction and 'invasive alien species' are the larges threats.
Two threats to seabirds are longline fishing and oil spills.

News about birds

Birds News -- ScienceDaily

Most close relatives of birds neared the potential for powered flight but few crossed its thresholds - New research has resulted in an updated evolutionary tree of early birds and their closest relatives to reconstruct powered flight potential, showing it evolved at least three times. Many ancestors of the closest bird relatives neared the thresholds of powered flight potential, suggesting broad experimentation with wing-assisted locomotion before flight evolved.
Mathematical patterns developed by Alan Turing help researchers understand bird behavior - Scientists have used mathematical modelling to understand why flocks of long-tailed tits segregate themselves into different parts of the landscape.
How boundaries become bridges in evolution - The mechanisms that make organisms locally fit and those responsible for change are distinct and occur sequentially in evolution.