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Birds

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Birds

There are approximately 400 endangered bird species in the world today. The bird habitat is getting smaller, despite increased government protection . Many bird species are reaching dangerously low numbers. Scores of bird species have become extinct in the past, far more than the current amount of existing bird species.

Through habitat destruction, the introduction of non-native species, and deliberate hunting, we endanger many species. In the last 280 years, 42 species and 44 subspecies of birds are known to have become extinct.

For more information about birds in different parts of the world, just follow one of the links under 'Read more about'.

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Habitat loss and degradation are threats African birds have to deal with.
Air pollution and human activities are the threats birds have to deal with in America.
The majority of Asian birds lives in forrests. These forrests are threatened by conversion to other land-uses and overexploitation. Therefor the birds are threatened by the same dangers.
Carrabean birds are threatened by erosion of pristine habitats and illegal trade of the birds.
Hunting and economic development are the majority of the causes that lead to death of birds in Europe.
On the pacific, habitat destruction and 'invasive alien species' are the larges threats.
Two threats to seabirds are longline fishing and oil spills.

News about birds

Birds News -- ScienceDaily

Will mallards hybridize their cousins out of existence? - Mallards -- the familiar ducks of city parks -- are one of a group of closely related species, many of which are far less common. Interbreeding can threaten the genetic distinctiveness of those other species and cause concern for their conservation. A new study investigates hybridization between mallards and mottled ducks, a species adapted for life in coastal marshes, and finds that while hybridization rates are currently low, human activity could cause them to rise in the future.
High-flying ducks cross Himalayas - A high-flying duck species reaches altitudes of up to 6,800 meters (22,000 feet) to cross the Himalayas, new research shows.
Clever cockatoos bend hooks into straight wire to fish for food - Bending of a hook into wire to fish for the handle of a basket by crow Betty 15 years ago stunned the scientific world. Cognitive biologists studied tool making in an Indonesian cockatoo. Other than crows, cockatoos are not using tools in the wild. The birds manufactured hook tools out of straight wire without ever having seen or used a hook tool before.