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Birds

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Birds

There are approximately 400 endangered bird species in the world today. The bird habitat is getting smaller, despite increased government protection . Many bird species are reaching dangerously low numbers. Scores of bird species have become extinct in the past, far more than the current amount of existing bird species.

Through habitat destruction, the introduction of non-native species, and deliberate hunting, we endanger many species. In the last 280 years, 42 species and 44 subspecies of birds are known to have become extinct.

For more information about birds in different parts of the world, just follow one of the links under 'Read more about'.

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Habitat loss and degradation are threats African birds have to deal with.
Air pollution and human activities are the threats birds have to deal with in America.
The majority of Asian birds lives in forrests. These forrests are threatened by conversion to other land-uses and overexploitation. Therefor the birds are threatened by the same dangers.
Carrabean birds are threatened by erosion of pristine habitats and illegal trade of the birds.
Hunting and economic development are the majority of the causes that lead to death of birds in Europe.
On the pacific, habitat destruction and 'invasive alien species' are the larges threats.
Two threats to seabirds are longline fishing and oil spills.

News about birds

Birds News -- ScienceDaily

Wind can prevent seabirds accessing their most important habitat - We marvel at flying animals because it seems like they can access anywhere, but a first study of its kind has revealed that wind can prevent seabirds from accessing the most important of habitats: their nests.
The fellowship of the wing: Pigeons flap faster to fly together - Homing pigeons fit in one extra wingbeat per second when flying in pairs compared to flying solo, new research reveals.
Monitoring biodiversity with sound: How machines can enrich our knowledge - Ecologists have long relied on their senses when it comes to recording animal populations and species diversity. However, modern programmable sound recording devices are now the better option for logging animal vocalizations. Scientists have investigated this using studies of birds as an example.